Footpath and the Midwest Weavers Conference

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Footpath.  The design for this moebius scarf was inspired by one of the patterns in the WGM’s 75th Anniversary “A Thread Through Time” book.  I used the basketweave tie up pattern on page 56 and translated it into a colorful geometric design, created with bits of colored and patterned paper pulled from junk mail and catalogs.  I assembled the geometric design, scanned it and created a seamlessly repeating pattern that was digitally printed on to fabric.

This last week was the Midwest Weavers Conference here in Minneapolis.  This is a regional conference hosted every other year in a different city.  Our local Weavers Guild were the hosts for the conference and I was asked to teach two technology classes as part of conference seminars, one about marketing yourself online and one about photo editing.  The piece above was my submission to the Instructors Exhibit.  Since I am only a little bit of a weaver, I didn’t want to have my little pieces on display with the masters, so I decided to go with what I am good at, but with a weaving twist.

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Our Weavers Guild is celebrating their 75th birthday this year.  As part of the celebration, they put together a book.  For years, as I understand it, the guild newsletter included a weaving draft and a tiny swatch of fabric made by volunteers, so in each newsletter, you not only got the pattern, but an example as well.  For their birthday, they pulled drafts from the archives and had guild members make contemporary pieces based on those designs and […]

2015-06-23T11:54:43+00:00Gallery Exhibitions, Out & About, Weaving, Felting & FIbers|Comments Off on Footpath and the Midwest Weavers Conference

I’ve got T-shirts!

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Today is the day!  I am launching a brand new line of designs printed on t-shirts and coffee mugs.  I took some of my most popular 1 inch button designs with fiber art puns and have turned them into t-shirt designs.  These are printed by a company called RedBubble on a variety of different t-shirts.  You choose the design, size, style and color and they will print and send it to you.  There are a lot of different companies that will do this, but I like the selection at RedBubble and their customer service is totally top notch. I have several t-shirts from RedBubble designed by other artists and I just got my own “Knit Long and Prosper” shirt to celebrate my own new designs.  These have been SO FUN to design and I am planning to keep adding more.  (Let me know if you have a special request!)

I am featuring my “Reed Me” design in this post to celebrate the first day of the Midwest Weavers Conference here in Minneapolis.  I did a volunteer shift for the conference this morning and I am teaching some workshops on Saturday.  I wanted to time the opening of this new online shop so that I can talk about it in my “Marketing Yourself Online” class at the conference as another way of having your work for sale by making coffee mugs or notecards or even t-shirts with images of your work.

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Screen Shot 2015-06-09 at 9.16.14 AMI have added a […]

Attention Fiber Geeks: Amplify your Art

This week I am teaching a class at the Weavers Guild of MN called “Amplify your Art”.  It started as a question: “Could you teach a class about soft circuits?”  My answer to that was “No, not really.  But what I can do…”

Part demonstration, part inspiration. This session will give you dozens of ideas for how to incorporate technology into your fiber art projects. We’ll cover a range of techno-possibilities, from electronic components like LED’s and conductive threads; to digital, 3-D printing and laser cutting; to chemistry with thermochromic and phosphorescent paints. Becka will show samples, provide sources, and do short demos to show how you can incorporate technology of all kinds into your weaving, spinning, and sewing projects. Thursday, June 11: 6:00-9:00 P.M.

I’m not really an expert in soft circuits.  I have built a couple.  I get the gist of it.  But I decided to take the incorporating technology theme of the class and run with it.  Because that I do know a lot about.

George (up there in the video) is made with a little traditional wiring (in the box) and some felt beads and conductive thread.  He’s really friendly, but a little shy.  If you hold hands with him, his nose lights up.  We will talk about how he is made.  I have also made three really fun examples with thermochromic pigment.  That means it changes color when you change the temperature.  I have an embroidered elephant embellished with LEDs.  I also have some UV reactive yarn.  We are going to make some sticker circuits in class. That’s right a little hands-on fun!  We will watch some videos of other artists doing cool stuff.  We will talk about 3-d […]

2015-06-08T15:18:31+00:00Classes & Teaching, UpcomingClasses, Weaving, Felting & FIbers|Comments Off on Attention Fiber Geeks: Amplify your Art

Bias Plaiting Baskets

imageI spent a truly delightful weekend taking a workshop from the very talented Jackie Abrams.  Textile Center had Jackie come to teach a 2 1/2 day class on bias plaited baskets.  I am not a basketweaver, in fact, I had only ever made one basket before I took this class.  This gave me a rating of “0” on my name tag at the start of class.  There were several of us “zeroes” in class and although we were the total beginners, I never felt like I was struggling to keep up even though there were “fives” in the room, a credit to Jackie’s teaching style.  I took the class on a whim.  Jackie was organized and thoughtful and just lovely to email back and forth with while I was setting up the class (so I knew I would like her) and it has been a challenging spring for me creatively and I thought this would be a great jump start.  I am so glad I did.

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Bias plaiting works on the bias.  You weave the base, over-under-over-under, and it looks just like a flat paper coaster.  It reminded me a lot of the woven paper placemats I have made with kids.  The bias comes in when you start to shape and you do that by bending things on the diagonal.  It was tough to get the hang of at first and I really forgot what it is like to be a beginner at something totally new.  It’s sort of rare that I jump into something that I don’t have a little experience with.  After wrestling with my first corner, […]

2014-06-06T15:46:05+00:00Classes & Teaching, Weaving, Felting & FIbers|Comments Off on Bias Plaiting Baskets

Exquisite Trims: Passamaneria Valmar, Florence Italy

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The Passamaneria Valmar is a tiny gem of a shop that carries an amazing selection of specialty trims.  Ribbons, cording, tassels, fringe – you name it and they have some.  The shelves literally go from floor to ceiling.  (Be sure to click on these panorama shots to see them larger in more detail.)  The shopkeeper and I didn’t have a lot of vocabulary in common, but when he saw the kinds of ribbons I was admiring, he started pulling out the ones that he thought were real treasures.  The two pieces I got he tells me were woven in Florence in the 50’s.

photo(5)Both are woven from silk and metallic threads (each is about 1.5 inches wide)  The blue and silver one is very shimmery and the cords on the black and brown one are thick silk cords that are couched on the top of the weave.  They are beautiful pieces and the photo doesn’t do justice at all to the rich colors (silk is too shiny to photograph well.)

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2013-10-10T14:22:48+00:00Everything Else, Weaving, Felting & FIbers|Comments Off on Exquisite Trims: Passamaneria Valmar, Florence Italy

Fondazione Lisio, Florence Italy

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Fondazione Lisio is a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving the traditions of of weaving silk velvet and brocade on jacquard looms, which are probably two of the most intricate and fascinating techniques I have ever seen woven.  We were very fortunate to have one of the fantastic and very knowledgable instructors, Julie Holyoke, who was willing to give us a guided tour of the school while there were about 10 students working on the looms.  The girl pictured above was creating a velvet.  The loom is two “stories” high (you can see the ladder to the top level in the photos below).  The students plot out a pattern and then key it into the cardboard punch cards, which are a very simple kind of computer program which helps the loom know which threads to move up and down for each row of the pattern.  We talked to one of the students who was making her punch cards that day and she was concentrating very hard to make sure she kept them in the right order.  On this loom, the warp threads are all on individual spools because when weaving a velvet, you need to be able to pull up the extra warp to make the velvet pile.  For each row of velvet, the weaver inserts a tiny brass slat that pulls up the warp threads to make a loop of a certain height.  A few rows are woven to hold them in place and then the weaver runs a razor blade along the top of the metal slat and hand cuts each row of pile.  You can see a photo on their website here. […]

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